Remembering life in Sunderland in 1994, when two exciting new landmarks were up for discussion

This was the year that a new bridge and a planned National Glass Center were on the agenda for talks.

Also in the headlines were a Sunderland Beatles fan, French-speaking Wearside children and dog dirt.

Want to know more? Read on.

All this and more made the Sunderland Echo news headlines in 1994.

Sunderland artist Mike Clay walked 120 miles to produce a picture of the city – from the air.

Mike, from Hendon, was commissioned by the council to produce the drawing after doing a similar job for Vaux Breweries.

He said: “It took about two months. I must have been up and down every street and back lane at least twice.

she loves them yeah yeah yeah! Vicky Forster really does love the Beatles.

Beatles superfan Vicky Forster of Sunderland.

The 17-year-old had a collection in 1994 which included books, videos, records and mementos as well as an original Dinky Yellow Submarine, a Beatles plate and a wooden figure of Paul McCartney.

Vicky, from Sunderland, explained: “I studied them when I was at school and gradually started to love their music and get hooked.”

the glamorous beach life is not exactly shared by the lifeguards at Seaburn but at least they look the part now.

They’ve just taken delivery of new uniforms and high chairs to keep a look-out.

Mike Clay who walked 120 miles to create a painting of Sunderland. Here he is presenting his picture to the Mayor Sunderland, Councilor Bryan Charlton.

More than 200 Wearside youngsters learned new languages ​​at European Dimensions Week in 1994 by playing games such as Pass The Parcel in French.

Sunderland’s planned £4.5million national glass center was the subject of a European-wide architects’ competition in 1994.

Entrants were invited to submit the most unusual eye-catching design for the building, which was being planned for the Manor Quay on the north bank of the Wear.

dean Mold, of Coxgreen, Sunderland, set himself up as a farrier in 1994. He had worked with horses all his life after leaving Houghton Kepier school and going to work for a farrier in North Shields for five and a half years.

A plaque recalling Sunderland’s part in the liberation of Europe, was unveiled on the 50th anniversary of D-Day.

plans for a new bridge over the River Wear moved a stage further when Deptford was earmarked as the front-runner for a £23million crossing.

Councilors heard that there were six early options for the site of the new city bridge.

a new plaque, recalling Sunderland’s part in the liberation of Europe, was unveiled on the 50th anniversary of D-Day.

Monkwearmouth Local History Group chose the historic occasion to perform the ceremony.

The plaque explained how Liberty Way, at North Sands, got its name and commemorated the liberty ships built at JL Thompson shipyard.

Read More

Read More

Seven Sunderland stories which made the news in 1982

A Euro-wide architects competition was launched in 1994 for the most unusual eye-catching design for the National Glass Centre.

residents at the Moor House Home in Hetton created a magnificent tapestry when they spent 10 weeks using traditional skills such as hooking, knitting, progging and embroidery. It included views of Hetton Hall, Bog Row School, and St Nicholas Church.

Betty Blyth’s retirement after 31 years had everyone in fine voice at Ryhope Junior School. A special song was composed to mark every departure as a non-teaching assistant. She also received a figurine, flowers and card.

Sunderland Council took delivery of new dog dirt bins to help cure the city’s poop plague.

Council workers put bins up along the seafront for careful dog owners to dispose of their dirt.

What are your memories of Wearside and County Durham back then? Tell us more by emailing [email protected]

Farrier Dean Mold pictured in 1994.
Lifeguards in their new uniforms, ready to spring into action, left to right: Mark Holland, John Todd and Hilton MCarthy.

Leave a Comment